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Unit 2, Priory Marina, Barkers Lane, Bedford, MK41 9DJ  

Tel 01767 640235/ 641014 

 
 

Dichroic Saver Pack 90 C.O.E.

SKU
DSP90

Regular Price: £50.00

Special Price £40.00

Great value these packs are guys. 

Each pack contain the following - 

2 x 2mm Clear Pattern  50mm x 100mm 

3 x 2mm Opal Plain  50mm x 100mm 

3 x 2mm Clear Colour  50mm x 100mm

(Packs may vary in colour) 

This stuff has to really be seen to appreciate the colour mixes and different effects.Dichroic glass is the term used to describe two completely different types of glass which undergo a colour change in certain lighting conditions. One material is a modern composite non-translucent glass that is produced by stacking layers of glass and micro-layers of metals or oxides which give the glass shifting colours depending on the angle of view, causing an array of colours to be displayed as an example of thin-film optics: the resulting glass is used for decorative purposes such as stained glass, jewellery and such, and although bearing the commercial title of "dichroic" can also be trichroic or can display any form of pleochroism and even iridescence in some cases, the terminology being more precise when it is produced for interference filters for laboratory use.

The other dichroic glass material first appeared in a few pieces of Roman glass from the 4th century and consists of a translucent glass containing colloidal gold and silver particles dispersed in the glass matrix in certain proportions so that the glass has the property of displaying a particular transmitted colour and a completely different reflected colour, as certain wavelengths of light either pass through or are reflected.[1] In ancient dichroic glass, as seen in the most famous piece, the 4th-century Lycurgus cup in the British Museum, the glass has a green colour when lit from in front in reflected light, and another, purple-ish red, when lit from inside or behind the cup so that the light passes through the glass. This is not due to alternating thin metal films but colloidal silver and gold particles dispersed throughout the glass, in an effect similar to that seen in gold ruby glass, though that has only one colour whatever the lighting


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  • Great value these packs are guys. 

    Each pack contain the following - 

    2 x 2mm Clear Pattern  50mm x 100mm 

    3 x 2mm Opal Plain  50mm x 100mm 

    3 x 2mm Clear Colour  50mm x 100mm

    ( Packs may vary in colour) 

    This stuff has to really be seen to appreciate the colour mixes and different effects.Dichroic glass is the term used to describe two completely different types of glass which undergo a colour change in certain lighting conditions. One material is a modern composite non-translucent glass that is produced by stacking layers of glass and micro-layers of metals or oxides which give the glass shifting colours depending on the angle of view, causing an array of colours to be displayed as an example of thin-film optics: the resulting glass is used for decorative purposes such as stained glass, jewellery and such, and although bearing the commercial title of "dichroic" can also be trichroic or can display any form of pleochroism and even iridescence in some cases, the terminology being more precise when it is produced for interference filters for laboratory use.

    The other dichroic glass material first appeared in a few pieces of Roman glass from the 4th century and consists of a translucent glass containing colloidal gold and silver particles dispersed in the glass matrix in certain proportions so that the glass has the property of displaying a particular transmitted colour and a completely different reflected colour, as certain wavelengths of light either pass through or are reflected.[1] In ancient dichroic glass, as seen in the most famous piece, the 4th-century Lycurgus cup in the British Museum, the glass has a green colour when lit from in front in reflected light, and another, purple-ish red, when lit from inside or behind the cup so that the light passes through the glass. This is not due to alternating thin metal films but colloidal silver and gold particles dispersed throughout the glass, in an effect similar to that seen in gold ruby glass, though that has only one colour whatever the lighting

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